Cocktail Of The Week
Brandy Alexander
The Average bartender, despite the slanders of professional moralists, is a man of self respect and self possession; a man who excels at a difficult art and is well aware of it; a man who shrinks from ruffianism as he does from uncleanliness; in short, a gentleman...

MasterClass

The Bartenders Beauty
Below are two very simple observations/poems of a bartender, which for me capture the essence of a skillful bartender's beauty.

ENJOY!!!

“A bartender’s beauty is in his moves, in the way he struts his stuff, in the field of rhythms that is set up in the orchestrated hatching of a large order of drinks. A skillful barkeep no more looks at his accouterments than a practiced typist or pianist peers at the keys, but works with both hands simultaneously, full blast, undimmed by the usual dull requirements of routine. (Even in a lull with only one drink to mix, he will not slacken his pace nor take a glyptic approach.) When he snatches the bottle from the well, he knows, without looking, that it is grenadine and not triple sec, and if it should prove to be triple sec, to bad, dad, the drink is already mixed. Stirring and sloshing, rinsing and wiping, pouring and garnishing, with a fry cook’s retention and an acrobat’s timing, he virtually dances through his shift, skating, as it were, on the chunky ice he scoops with furious delicacy into each glass.”

Tom Robbins
“Jitterbug Perfume”

“The average bartender, despite the slanders of professional moralists, is a man of self respect and self possession; a man who excels at a difficult art and is well aware of it; a man who shrinks from ruffian-ism as he does from uncleanliness; in short, a gentleman… the bartender is one of the most dignified, law abiding, and ascetic of men. He is guided by a rigid code of professional ethics; his work demands a clear head and a steady hand; he must have sound and fluent conversation; he cannot be drunken or dirty; the slightest dubiousness is quick to exile him to the police force, journalism, the oyster boats, or some other Siberia of the broken.”
                        
HL Mencken
Baltimore Evening Sun
May 11, 1911